Zechariah 12:10 – Looking on the One We Have Pierced

[Emphasis is added in the following verses to show their connection.]

Zechariah 12:10 “I will pour out on the house of David and on the inhabitants of Jerusalem, the Spirit of grace and of supplication, so that they will look on Me whom they have pierced; and they will mourn for Him, as one mourns for an only son, and they will weep bitterly over Him like the bitter weeping over a firstborn.

*****

Revelation 1:7 BEHOLD, HE IS COMING WITH THE CLOUDS, and every eye will see Him, even those who pierced Him; and all the tribes of the earth will mourn over Him. So it is to be. Amen.

The “all caps” in Revelation 1:7 above are the translators’ way of telling us that the writer is quoting the Old Testament; in this case, Daniel 7:13.  However, the writer is also alluding to Zechariah 12:10, which is obvious when the verses are juxtaposed as they are above.

In the crucifixion of Jesus Christ, we see God “pierced,” for God was in Christ.  Thus when we look upon the one we have pierced, we are looking upon God; and when we look upon God, we are looking upon the one we have pierced.

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. (In the NASB New Testament, quotations of the Old Testament are rendered in all capital letters in order to make them easier to identify.)

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SL004 – The Four Gospels

This podcast episode focuses on the Four Gospels.

The Bible contains four Gospels: Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John.

These Gospels can be considered ancient biographies, taking a slightly different form from modern biographies.

Gospel comes from a word meaning “good news” – particularly, an announcement or proclamation of good news about a new kingdom or king.  The word “gospel” is rooted in the Old Testament:  Isaiah 40:9; 52:7; 61:1

The four Gospels cover the period of Jesus earthly ministry and say very little about His childhood or early adulthood. This is because those who were called to bear witness to HIm (i.e. the apostles) generally knew Him during that period and not before.

The Gospels report the deeds and the teachings of Jesus.

The Gospels spend the greatest time on the Lord’s last week before His crucifixion.

Each Gospel gives different details, but all are consistent on the essential facts.

Part I:  Intro to the Gospels
 
Part II:  Matthew and Mark
 
Part III:  Luke and John
 
IV:  Summary of the Four Gospels
See the new documentary “Jesus of Testimony” at www.jesusoftestimony.com.  See my review as well:  “Jesus of Testimony” – New Documentary Testifies to the Historicity of Jesus Christ

Practically all of the 12 apostles died as martyrs.

At the end of the post, I quoted “One Solitary Life” which can be found at this post:  One Solitary Life

Relevant related posts from this blog:

The Word “Gospel” in the Old Testament

New Testament Expressions Which Originated in the Old Testament

New Testament Words Which Are Really Old Testament Words

Posts from other sources:

Number of Chapters, Verses, and Words in the New Testament, by Book

 

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Zechariah 12:10 – The Spirit of Grace We Do Not Want to Insult

[Emphasis is added in the following verses to show their connection.  I'm wanting you to see clearly that the New Testament verse (i.e., Hebrews 10:29) is quoting an expression from the Old Testament (i.e., Zechariah 12:10).]

Zechariah 12:10 “I will pour out on the house of David and on the inhabitants of Jerusalem, the Spirit of grace and of supplication, so that they will look on Me whom they have pierced; and they will mourn for Him, as one mourns for an only son, and they will weep bitterly over Him like the bitter weeping over a firstborn.

*****

Hebrews 10:29 How much severer punishment do you think he will deserve who has trampled under foot the Son of God, and has regarded as unclean the blood of the covenant by which he was sanctified, and has insulted the Spirit of grace?

The New Testament writers relied completely on the Old Testament Scriptures as enlightened by the Holy Spirit.  The writer of Hebrews is here evoking the spirit and words of the prophet Zechariah.  This “Spirit of grace” permeated the New Testament church (John 1:14, 16, 17), but was in danger of being taken for granted.  For this reason the letter of Hebrews was written:  to exhort believers to stir themselves to pay much closer attention to what they had heard (Hebrews 2:1; 13:22).

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

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The Word of the Lord Leads to the Fear of the Lord

Listening to the word of God causes our fear of God to grow…and that’s a good thing.  Therefore, if you want your reverence for God to grow, listen more to Him.  [Emphasis added in the following verses.]

Deuteronomy 4:10 “Remember the day you stood before the LORD your God at Horeb, when the LORD said to me, ‘Assemble the people to Me, that I may let them hear My words so they may learn to fear Me all the days they live on the earth, and that they may teach their children.’

*****

Psalm 34:11 Come, you children, listen to me;
I will teach you the fear of the LORD.

*****

Psalm 119:38 Establish Your word to Your servant,
As that which produces reverence for You.

*****

Isaiah 57:11 “Of whom were you worried and fearful
When you lied, and did not remember Me
Nor give Me a thought?
Was I not silent even for a long time
So you do not fear Me?

*****

Return to the word of the Lord that you have heard…and He will speak more to you.

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

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The Apostles Have Given Us the Word of the Lord

When Jesus prayed the night before He died, He remembered those of us who would believe in Him through those He sent:

John 17:20 “I do not ask on behalf of these alone, but for those also who believe in Me through their word;

They wouldn’t be bearing witness to Him in their own power alone.  He was going to send them help, for He promised them:

John 14:26 “But the Helper, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in My name, He will teach you all things, and bring to your remembrance all that I said to you.

The apostles would be able to tell us what the Lord did and what the Lord taught them through Holy Spirit who would be aiding their memories.  From that point on, they just had to report what they had seen and heard.  No embellishment or rhetorical flourishes would be necessary:

2 Peter 1:16 For we did not follow cleverly devised tales when we made known to you the power and coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, but we were eyewitnesses of His majesty.

Even Paul, who was not one of the original twelve, would lean on this same Holy Spirit to bring us the word of God:

1 Thessalonians 2:13 For this reason we also constantly thank God that when you received the word of God which you heard from us, you accepted it not as the word of men, but for what it really is, the word of God, which also performs its work in you who believe.

Thus to believe the apostles is to believe the One who sent them.

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

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Psalm 149:1 – A Prophecy of Christ and the New Testament Church

Psalm 149:1 Praise the LORD!
Sing to the LORD a new song,
And His praise in the congregation of the godly ones.

When Jesus was raised from the dead, the Psalms became a new book – filled with new songs.

Psalm 2 was no longer a song for Israel’s king – it was now a song for Israel’s resurrected king, reigning supreme in heaven over all creation!

Psalm 16 was no longer a song to celebrate how God keeps death at bay – it was now a song about how God brings about new and greater life through death and in spite of it!

Psalm 22 was no longer a song of praise to a God who helps with difficult -it was now a song about how God had overcome the greatest difficulty of all, which was death.

And on you could go through the book of Psalms.

The New Testament churches were singing these psalms in a way they had never been sung before – it was a new way!  And it was the way through death – the most formidable enemy mankind had ever encountered.  Thus the praise of Christ was sung throughout “the congregation of the godly ones,” which was, of course, the gatherings we call the New Testament church.

The meaning of “congregation” in this verse and of “church” in the New Testament is the same.  Therefore, this verse prophesied the New Testament church.  Our New Testaments bear ample witness to the fulfillment of this prophecy!

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

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Psalm 22 Follows the Pattern of Suffering and Glory for Messiah

Read Psalm 22 in its entirety (that is, Psalm 22:1-31) and see that from verse 1 through the 18th verse, Messiah’s suffering is prophesied – sometimes in incredible detail.  (Remember that this psalm was written centuries before Jesus was born, which makes the detail all the more astonishing!)

Then notice that in verse 19 the tone begins to turn triumphant, and it crescendos to the end of the psalm.  This marked the glory of Christ’s deliverance from death in the resurrection.

This pattern of suffering and then glory for the Messiah is a theme of what we call the Old Testament.

As Paul preached:

Acts 26:22 “So, having obtained help from God, I stand to this day testifying both to small and great, stating nothing but what the Prophets and Moses said was going to take place;
Acts 26:23 that the Christ was to suffer, and that by reason of His resurrection from the dead He would be the first to proclaim light both to the Jewish people and to the Gentiles.”

You can see how Psalm 22 follows the pattern Paul lays out here.  You can even see Christ (Messiah) proclaiming that light in verse 22!  This point is then confirmed by Hebrews 2:12.  Therefore, as He suffered and was glorified, so we who suffer with Him will be glorified with Him (Romans 8:17).

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

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SL003 – My God, My God Why Hast Thou Forsaken Me?

This is the third episode of this podcast. Because I am, with this episode, changing the name from “Biblical LIteracy” to “Scriptural Literacy,” the numbering sequence prefix will change from “BL” to “SL.” Thus the series will be numbered BL001, BL002, SL003, SL004, SL005, and so on.

This is an abbreviated version of this week’s podcast because I want to give all listeners time to listen to the audio book “Whatever Became of Jesus Christ? The Biblical Case for the Second Coming as Accomplished Fact.” It is available through the same means that allowed you to access this podcast – whether that be my website (www.mikegantt.com) or the iTunes Directory, or Stitcher, or somewhere else.

The focus of this week’s teaching is understanding the Bible as a self-referential volume of writings. That is, each of the Bible’s writings often makes reference to previous Bible writings. For example, the New Testament is overflowing with references to the Old Testament. Bible readers need to appreciate this sort of “intertextuality” lest they gloss over those references and thereby misunderstand what they’re reading.

We use as a case study for this dynamic Jesus’ words from the cross “My God, My God, Why Hast Thou Forsaken Me.” Some people only know these words from the New Testament and don’t understand that Jesus was reciting Psalm 22 from the Old Testament.

Go to www.mikegantt.com/SL003 for more study notes on this podcast episode.

For more study on Psalm 22 and how it is fulfilled in the New Testament, see:

Psalm 22 – A Psalm of Christ

Psalm 22 – A Celebration of Christ’s Resurrection in the New Testament Churches

Christ’s Prayer for Deliverance from Death Was Heard – The Prophecy of Answered Prayer in Psalm 22 Was Fulfilled

Psalm 22 Follows the Pattern of Suffering and Glory for Messiah

On a more general view of psalms as fulfilled in the New Testament, see:

Psalms Were a Common Part of New Testament Church Gatherings

On a more general view of how dependent the New Testament writers were on the Old Testament, see:

New Testament Expressions Which Originated in the Old Testament

New Testament Words Which Are Really Old Testament Words

The Apostles’ Lexicon

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Video Series to Help You Do Word Studies with the Online NASB

I have written about why I love the New American Standard Bible (NASB) and why I love Strong’s Concordance.  Now I have created a 7-part video series to show you how those of you who have an interest can use them online.

  • Intro to the NASB and Lockman Foundation – Part 1 of 7  (2:07)
  • Searching for a Bible Verse in the Online NASB – Part 2 of 7  (2:14)
  • Searching for More Bible Chapters and Verses – Part 3 of 7   (3:18)
  • The Layout of the Lockman Page – Part 4 of 7  (3:14)
  • Searching for a Word in the NASB – Part 5 of 7  (3:57)
  • Limitations of NASB Searching at the Lockman Page – Part 6 of 7  (3:28)
  • How to Study a Word in the NASB Using Strong’s Concordance – Part 7 of 7  (10:54)
  • Total time for the series:  29:10

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Christ’s Prayer for Deliverance from Death Was Heard – The Prophecy of Answered Prayer in Psalm 22 Was Fulfilled

Consider the plight of Jesus the night before He was killed:

Hebrews 5:7 In the days of His flesh, He offered up both prayers and supplications with loud crying and tears to the One able to save Him from death, and He was heard because of His piety.

That Christ’s prayer was heard is foretold in the latter part of Psalm 22.  Here’s a portion:

Psalm 22:24 For [God] has not despised nor abhorred the affliction of the afflicted;
Nor has He hidden His face from him;
But when he cried to Him for help, He heard.

The “heard” of Psalm 22:24 is surely the “heard” of Hebrews 5:7.  The first was prophecy; the second was a report of the fulfillment of that prophecy.

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

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