1 Kings 2:12

1 Kings 2:12 And Solomon sat on the throne of David his father, and his kingdom was firmly established.

Knowing that the Old Testament foreshadows Christ, we can more easily see, and therefore say, “And the Lord Jesus sat on the throne of God His Father, and the kingdom of God was firmly established.

Let us honor and serve Jesus Christ – the King of the kingdom of God!

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. (In the NASB New Testament, quotations of the Old Testament are rendered in all capital letters in order to make them easier to identify.)

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1 Kings 1:47

1 Kings 1:47 “Moreover, the king’s servants came to bless our lord King David, saying, ‘May your God make the name of Solomon better than your name and his throne greater than your throne!’…

We know that Solomon is a type of Christ.  This knowledge helps us to see that the relationship of David and Solomon is a type of the relationship between God the Father and the Lord Jesus Christ.  That is, as David was a man of war and Solomon a man of peace, so God the Father helped Israel in its wars but Jesus would never take up the sword.  Also, as David planned the construction of the temple but Solomon was the one who built it, so God the Father planned the salvation of humanity but Jesus was the one who executed it.  Thus the wish of the servants that Solomon would have a greater name than David has application to God and Christ as well.

What loving father does not want his son to outdo him?  How much more than did God want the name of Christ to be above every name (Philippians 2:9-11).

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. (In the NASB New Testament, quotations of the Old Testament are rendered in all capital letters in order to make them easier to identify.)

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Jesus as the Christ and the Son of God

Often in the New Testament, we see Jesus referred to as the Christ (i.e. the Messiah) and the Son of God in the same breath.  These two titles were prominently paired in Psalm 2 where verse 2 speaks of God’s “Anointed” (or Christ or Messiah, since all have the same meaning) and verse 7 has God calling Him “My Son.”  These paired titles were also alluded to in 2 Samuel 7 when Nathan prophesied to David of his royal descendant – a descendant to whom God Himself promised to be “a father.”  For this reason, “the Christ” and “the Son of God” titles are easily and often coupled when speaking of this special descendant of David. Here are some obvious examples [emphasis added]:

Matthew 16:16 Simon Peter answered, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.”

Matthew 26:63 But Jesus kept silent. And the high priest said to Him, “I adjure You by the living God, that You tell us whether You are the Christ, the Son of God.”

Mark 1:1 The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God.

Luke 4:41 Demons also were coming out of many, shouting, “You are the Son of God!” But rebuking them, He would not allow them to speak, because they knew Him to be the Christ.

John 11:27 She *said to Him, “Yes, Lord; I have believed that You are the Christ, the Son of God, even He who comes into the world.”

John 20:31 but these have been written so that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God; and that believing you may have life in His name.

2 Corinthians 1:19 For the Son of God, Christ Jesus, who was preached among you by us–by me and Silvanus and Timothy–was not yes and no, but is yes in Him.

Galatians 2:20 “I have been crucified with Christ; and it is no longer I who live, but Christ lives in me; and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave Himself up for me.

Ephesians 4:13 until we all attain to the unity of the faith, and of the knowledge of the Son of God, to a mature man, to the measure of the stature which belongs to the fullness of Christ.

2 John 1:3 Grace, mercy and peace will be with us, from God the Father and from Jesus Christ, the Son of the Father, in truth and love.

The promise of an Anointed king for Israel who would also be the Son of God was well known among the Jewish people.  What was not so well known was the startling greatness to which these titles pointed.  Only in the wake of Jesus having come and having been raised from the dead have we begun to see the glorious and profound meanings God has invested in these terms.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

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Titles for Jesus Used in the Gospel of Matthew

Here are the primary names or titles ascribed to Jesus in the Gospel of Matthew:

Matthew Presents Jesus as the Son of God

Matthew Presents Jesus as the King of the Jews

Matthew Presents Jesus as the Son of David

Matthew Presents Jesus as the Messiah (Christ)

Matthew Presents Jesus as the Son of Man

Matthew Presents Jesus as Lord

These names had been prophesied in the Old Testament, but no one was sure what they all meant nor how they related to each other.  In Jesus of Nazareth, however, all the puzzle pieces fit together.  Jesus suffered as a man that He might be glorified as God.  For more on this, see The Old Testament (that is, the Hebrew Bible) Is About Jesus Christ – His Suffering and Glory.

Other names were applied to Jesus in the Gospel of Matthew, including Teacher and Rabbi.  The names listed above, however, are the most notable ones – and all of them have prophetic significance (which means, among others things, an Old Testament background).

Of course, the most common way that Matthew refers to Jesus is as, simply, “Jesus.”  Over 170 times, Matthew speaks of Jesus.  “Jesus did this; Jesus did that.”  “Jesus said this; Jesus said that.”  Matthew does not normally say, “The Messiah did this,” or “The Son of God did that.”  Those titles are usually employed when someone Matthew is quoting is speaking to or about Jesus.

You may recall that “Jesus” was the name given to Mary’s first child by an angel of the Lord (Matthew 1:21).  “Jesus” is the Greek form of the Hebrew name “Joshua.”  Therefore, a Jewish contemporary of Jesus would probably see His connection with Moses even more quickly than we would.

There’s a lot in a name.  Especially when it comes to someone so true to His name.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

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Matthew Presents Jesus as Lord

In the 1st Century, the term “Lord” could be used in a wide variety of ways.  It could simply be a way of showing respect to a social superior (akin to saying, “Sir”) or it could be a way of referencing God Almighty.  We need to keep this elasticity of application in mind as we consider that “Lord” was the most common form of direct address that people used with Jesus.

Occasionally in the Gospel of Matthew, Jesus referred to Himself as Lord*.  You find that in these verses:

Matthew 7:21-22

Matthew 12:8

Matthew 24:42

Matthew 25:11, 37, 44

Here are those occasions where others address Jesus as Lord:

Matthew 8:2, 6, 8, 21, 25

Matthew 9:28

Matthew 14:28, 30

Matthew 15:22, 27

Matthew 16:22

Matthew 17:4, 15

Matthew 18:21

Matthew 20:30, 31, 33

Matthew 22:43, 44, 45

Matthew 26:22

Of course, once Jesus was raised from the dead, the title “Lord” took on much greater significance.

*The verses where Jesus refers to Himself as Lord all look ahead to the point after the resurrection when He would receive heavenly glories.  He certainly did not go around seeking for people to treat him as that kind of Lord while He was on earth.  On the contrary, He came to serve, not to be served (Matthew 20:28).

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

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Matthew Presents Jesus as the Son of Man

In Matthew’s Gospel, as in the other Gospels, Jesus seldom referred to Himself as the Son of God or the Son of David or the Messiah (the Christ).  He did, however, often refer to Himself as “the Son of Man,” especially as his crucifixion approached and he was looking beyond it to the glories he would experience in heaven.

By contrast, those who listened to Jesus seemed puzzled by this self-description.  Nevertheless, his disciples came to understand that this was the third-person way he spoke of himself.  For when Peter gave his famous answer “Thou are the Christ, the Son of the living God,” it was to the question from Jesus, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?”

Here are the many occasions in the Gospel of Matthew where Jesus refers to himself as the Son of Man:

Matthew 8:20

Matthew 9:6

Matthew 10:23

Matthew 11:19

Matthew 12:8, 32, 40

Matthew 13:37, 41

Matthew 16:13, 28

Matthew 17:9, 12, 22

Matthew 18:11

Matthew 19:28

Matthew 20:18, 28

Matthew 24:27, 30, 37, 39, 44

Matthew 25:31

Matthew 26:2

Matthew 26:24, 45, 64

The expression “son of man” often appears in the Old Testament as simply a synonym for a human being.  It also appears notably in Psalm 8, in Ezekiel as the way God addressed Ezekiel, and then, grandly, in Daniel 7:13-14 as “one like a son of man” receives “an everlasting kingdom” from “the Ancient of Days.”

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

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Matthew Presents Jesus as the Messiah (Christ)

The terms “Messiah” (of Hebrew origin) and “Christ” (of Greek origin) mean the same thing: “the Anointed One,” which refers to the great royal descendant that God had promised to King David.  (I will use the term “Messiah” throughout the rest of this post, but I could have just as easily used “Christ.”  Therefore, you may mentally substitute one for the other as you read through.) Here then are verses from the Gospel according to Matthew wherein the term “Messiah” is mentioned:

Matthew 1:1, 16, 17, 18  (Matthew identifies Jesus as the Messiah)

Matthew 2:4  (King Herod asks the religious leaders where the Messiah was to be born.)

Matthew 11:2  (Matthew writes of John the Baptist hearing about “the works of Christ,” meaning the miracles that Jesus was performing.)

Matthew 16:16  (Peter famously confesses to Jesus, “You are the Messiah.”)

Matthew 16:20  (Jesus instructs his disciples not to reveal his messianic identity, which was not to be proclaimed until he had been raised from the dead.)

Matthew 22:42  (Jesus confronts the Pharisees with their inability to explain how David could refer to the Messiah as Lord, since the Messiah would be a descendant of David.  The explanation, of course, would come soon enough in Jesus’ resurrection.)

 Matthew 23:10  (Jesus tells his disciples not to be called leaders for that role is reserved for the Messiah.)

Matthew 24:5, 23, 24  (Jesus warns his disciples that false messiahs will appear as the movement in his name grows.)

Matthew 26:63  (At Jesus’ trial, the high priest asks him if he is the Messiah.)

Matthew 26:68  (Mockers sarcastically call Jesus the Messiah.)

Matthew 27:21-22  (Pontius Pilate asks the Jewish crowd whether they want him to release Barabbas or “Jesus who is called Messiah.”)

Again, “Messiah” and “Christ” are interchangeable words.  Their meaning is identical.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

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Matthew Presents Jesus as the Son of David

Matthew’s Gospel makes clear that Jesus was widely regarded by his contemporaries as a descendant of King David, and by his followers as the special descendant of David called Messiah (or Christ).

Here are the verses in which Matthew makes these kind of references:

Matthew 1:1  (Matthew himself calls Jesus “the son of David.”)

Matthew 1:2-16  (Matthew gives a genealogy of Jesus through Joseph which identifies David as being his ancestor; Luke 3 contains Jesus’ genealogy through Mary.)

Matthew 1:20  (An angel of the Lord addresses Jesus’ earthly father Joseph as a “son of David.”)

Matthew 9:27  (Two blind men follow Jesus and cry out for mercy from the “Son of David.”)

Matthew 12:23  (The crowds watching Jesus’ miraculous healing powers at work ask themselves if he can be “the Son of David,” meaning “Can he be the Messiah?”)

Matthew 15:22  (A Canaanite woman asks for help for her demon-possessed daughter from the “Son of David.”)

Matthew 20:30-31  (As Jesus passes by, two blind men sitting by the side of the road cry out repeatedly, “Lord, Son of David, have mercy on us.”)

Matthew 21:9, 15 (As Jesus enters Jerusalem, he is greeted with shouts of “Hosanna to the Son of David!”)

Matthew 22:42  (Jesus points out to the Pharisees that their belief in Psalm 110:1 as a messianic prophecy presents them with a riddle they cannot solve.  The answer was, of course, his own resurrection from the dead to the right hand of God which would make him both the “son” and the “Lord” of the one who wrote the prophecy:  David.)

God had promised to David a descendant who would have a far greater kingdom than David did.  David expanded on this idea in Psalm 2.  One of the points of Matthew’s Gospel is that Jesus of Nazareth was what God had in mind when the Holy Spirit originally inspired those prophecies.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

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Matthew Presents Jesus as the King of the Jews

All four gospels describe how the term “King of the Jews” was used at the time of Jesus’ cruficixion, and even printed on a sign at the head of his cross. The Messiah (i.e. the Christ) was King David’s descendant, slated to become an even greater king of Israel than David had been.  The Jewish authoritites convicted Jesus because they believed that his claim to be the Messiah was false; the Roman authorities crucified him because any claimant to the title of Jewish king would be a threat to existing Roman order (Rome was backing the Jewish king named Herod).  Thus to call Jesus “the king of the Jews” was arouse sentiments of both Jews and Romans.

What distinguishes the Gospel of Matthew in this regard is that he brings up the use of the term “King of the Jews” at the beginning of Jesus’ life, and he is the only gospel writer to have done so.

According to Matthew 2:1-2, “magi from the east” arrived in Jerusalem asking “Where is He who has been born King of the Jews?”   This ultimately led to King Herod slaughtering any infants that might fit that description in and around Bethlehem, the prophesied birthplace of the Messiah.

Clearly, Jesus was the king of the Jews God had promised (2 Samuel 7 and Psalm 2).  That he was labeled so on his cross by those who put him there is the greatest irony of history.  Thus, Matthew brings to light that Jesus was born the King of the Jews and He died the King of the Jews.

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. (In the NASB New Testament, quotations of the Old Testament are rendered in all capital letters in order to make them easier to identify.)

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Matthew Presents Jesus as the Son of God

The Gospel of Matthew addresses many issues appreciated by those familiar with the Hebrew Bible (i.e. the Old Testament).

For one thing, Matthew finds occasions throughout his book to refer to Jesus as the Son of God.  This term had significance for Jews because of its specific use in their Scriptures.  Specifically, 2 Samuel 7:14 (where God says to David about his future descendant “I will be a father to him and he will be a son to me”) and Psalm 2:6-7 (where that descendant, the Messiah, was installed as king of God’s people with the declaration from God to him: “You are My Son”).

Thus 21st-century man hears the expression “Son of God” without always appreciating how Matthew and his readers thought of those words.  Modern man has been conditioned by two thousand years of church theology.  Try to listen to the words as the writer intended them – a writer who knew nothing of the two thousand years of church tradition that would follow him.

Here there are the verses where you can find reference to Jesus being called the Son of God:

Matthew 3:16-17  (Jesus is baptized by John the Baptist and a voice out of the heaven says “This is My beloved Son, in whom I am well-pleased!”)

Matthew 4:3, 6  (Satan challenges the heavenly statement:  “If You are the Son of God…”)

Matthew 8:29  (Demons address Jesus as “Son of God.”)

Matthew 14:33 (After seeing Jesus calm the storm that had threatened them, Jesus’ disciples exclaimed, “You are certainly God’s Son!”)

Matthew 16:16  (Peter makes his famous confession, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.”)

Matthew 17:5  (On the Mount of Transfiguration, a voice out of the cloud said, “This is My beloved Son, with whom I am well-pleased; listen to Him!”)

Matthew 26:63  (The high priest at Jesus’ trial asks Him point blank, “I adjure You by the living God, that you tell us whether You are the Christ, the Son of God.”)

Matthew 27:40, 43  (As He is hanging on the cross, mockers call Him “the Son of God” with sarcasm and ridicule.)

Matthew 27:54  (As Jesus is dying on the cross, a Roman soldier says “Truly this was the Son of God!”  It’s not likely that he appreciated the Jewish meaning of the term.  Rather, he probably was using the term of the hour to acknowledge that, yes, there was something altogether unique and godly about this man.)

The identity of Jesus as the Son of God was by no means the only theme Matthew gave his readers.  It was, however, and signficant one.  And only in the resurrection of the Christ could humanity begin to appreciate just how signficant the term was yet to become.

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. (In the NASB New Testament, quotations of the Old Testament are rendered in all capital letters in order to make them easier to identify.)

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