Matthew Presents Jesus as the Messiah (Christ)

The terms “Messiah” (of Hebrew origin) and “Christ” (of Greek origin) mean the same thing: “the Anointed One,” which refers to the great royal descendant that God had promised to King David.  (I will use the term “Messiah” throughout the rest of this post, but I could have just as easily used “Christ.”  Therefore, you may mentally substitute one for the other as you read through.) Here then are verses from the Gospel according to Matthew wherein the term “Messiah” is mentioned:

Matthew 1:1, 16, 17, 18  (Matthew identifies Jesus as the Messiah)

Matthew 2:4  (King Herod asks the religious leaders where the Messiah was to be born.)

Matthew 11:2  (Matthew writes of John the Baptist hearing about “the works of Christ,” meaning the miracles that Jesus was performing.)

Matthew 16:16  (Peter famously confesses to Jesus, “You are the Messiah.”)

Matthew 16:20  (Jesus instructs his disciples not to reveal his messianic identity, which was not to be proclaimed until he had been raised from the dead.)

Matthew 22:42  (Jesus confronts the Pharisees with their inability to explain how David could refer to the Messiah as Lord, since the Messiah would be a descendant of David.  The explanation, of course, would come soon enough in Jesus’ resurrection.)

 Matthew 23:10  (Jesus tells his disciples not to be called leaders for that role is reserved for the Messiah.)

Matthew 24:5, 23, 24  (Jesus warns his disciples that false messiahs will appear as the movement in his name grows.)

Matthew 26:63  (At Jesus’ trial, the high priest asks him if he is the Messiah.)

Matthew 26:68  (Mockers sarcastically call Jesus the Messiah.)

Matthew 27:21-22  (Pontius Pilate asks the Jewish crowd whether they want him to release Barabbas or “Jesus who is called Messiah.”)

Again, “Messiah” and “Christ” are interchangeable words.  Their meaning is identical.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

Matthew Presents Jesus as the Son of David

Matthew’s Gospel makes clear that Jesus was widely regarded by his contemporaries as a descendant of King David, and by his followers as the special descendant of David called Messiah (or Christ).

Here are the verses in which Matthew makes these kind of references:

Matthew 1:1  (Matthew himself calls Jesus “the son of David.”)

Matthew 1:2-16  (Matthew gives a genealogy of Jesus through Joseph which identifies David as being his ancestor; Luke 3 contains Jesus’ genealogy through Mary.)

Matthew 1:20  (An angel of the Lord addresses Jesus’ earthly father Joseph as a “son of David.”)

Matthew 9:27  (Two blind men follow Jesus and cry out for mercy from the “Son of David.”)

Matthew 12:23  (The crowds watching Jesus’ miraculous healing powers at work ask themselves if he can be “the Son of David,” meaning “Can he be the Messiah?”)

Matthew 15:22  (A Canaanite woman asks for help for her demon-possessed daughter from the “Son of David.”)

Matthew 20:30-31  (As Jesus passes by, two blind men sitting by the side of the road cry out repeatedly, “Lord, Son of David, have mercy on us.”)

Matthew 21:9, 15 (As Jesus enters Jerusalem, he is greeted with shouts of “Hosanna to the Son of David!”)

Matthew 22:42  (Jesus points out to the Pharisees that their belief in Psalm 110:1 as a messianic prophecy presents them with a riddle they cannot solve.  The answer was, of course, his own resurrection from the dead to the right hand of God which would make him both the “son” and the “Lord” of the one who wrote the prophecy:  David.)

God had promised to David a descendant who would have a far greater kingdom than David did.  David expanded on this idea in Psalm 2.  One of the points of Matthew’s Gospel is that Jesus of Nazareth was what God had in mind when the Holy Spirit originally inspired those prophecies.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

Matthew Presents Jesus as the King of the Jews

All four gospels describe how the term “King of the Jews” was used at the time of Jesus’ cruficixion, and even printed on a sign at the head of his cross. The Messiah (i.e. the Christ) was King David’s descendant, slated to become an even greater king of Israel than David had been.  The Jewish authoritites convicted Jesus because they believed that his claim to be the Messiah was false; the Roman authorities crucified him because any claimant to the title of Jewish king would be a threat to existing Roman order (Rome was backing the Jewish king named Herod).  Thus to call Jesus “the king of the Jews” was arouse sentiments of both Jews and Romans.

What distinguishes the Gospel of Matthew in this regard is that he brings up the use of the term “King of the Jews” at the beginning of Jesus’ life, and he is the only gospel writer to have done so.

According to Matthew 2:1-2, “magi from the east” arrived in Jerusalem asking “Where is He who has been born King of the Jews?”   This ultimately led to King Herod slaughtering any infants that might fit that description in and around Bethlehem, the prophesied birthplace of the Messiah.

Clearly, Jesus was the king of the Jews God had promised (2 Samuel 7 and Psalm 2).  That he was labeled so on his cross by those who put him there is the greatest irony of history.  Thus, Matthew brings to light that Jesus was born the King of the Jews and He died the King of the Jews.

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. (In the NASB New Testament, quotations of the Old Testament are rendered in all capital letters in order to make them easier to identify.)

Matthew Presents Jesus as the Son of God

The Gospel of Matthew addresses many issues appreciated by those familiar with the Hebrew Bible (i.e. the Old Testament).

For one thing, Matthew finds occasions throughout his book to refer to Jesus as the Son of God.  This term had significance for Jews because of its specific use in their Scriptures.  Specifically, 2 Samuel 7:14 (where God says to David about his future descendant “I will be a father to him and he will be a son to me”) and Psalm 2:6-7 (where that descendant, the Messiah, was installed as king of God’s people with the declaration from God to him: “You are My Son”).

Thus 21st-century man hears the expression “Son of God” without always appreciating how Matthew and his readers thought of those words.  Modern man has been conditioned by two thousand years of church theology.  Try to listen to the words as the writer intended them – a writer who knew nothing of the two thousand years of church tradition that would follow him.

Here there are the verses where you can find reference to Jesus being called the Son of God:

Matthew 3:16-17  (Jesus is baptized by John the Baptist and a voice out of the heaven says “This is My beloved Son, in whom I am well-pleased!”)

Matthew 4:3, 6  (Satan challenges the heavenly statement:  “If You are the Son of God…”)

Matthew 8:29  (Demons address Jesus as “Son of God.”)

Matthew 14:33 (After seeing Jesus calm the storm that had threatened them, Jesus’ disciples exclaimed, “You are certainly God’s Son!”)

Matthew 16:16  (Peter makes his famous confession, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.”)

Matthew 17:5  (On the Mount of Transfiguration, a voice out of the cloud said, “This is My beloved Son, with whom I am well-pleased; listen to Him!”)

Matthew 26:63  (The high priest at Jesus’ trial asks Him point blank, “I adjure You by the living God, that you tell us whether You are the Christ, the Son of God.”)

Matthew 27:40, 43  (As He is hanging on the cross, mockers call Him “the Son of God” with sarcasm and ridicule.)

Matthew 27:54  (As Jesus is dying on the cross, a Roman soldier says “Truly this was the Son of God!”  It’s not likely that he appreciated the Jewish meaning of the term.  Rather, he probably was using the term of the hour to acknowledge that, yes, there was something altogether unique and godly about this man.)

The identity of Jesus as the Son of God was by no means the only theme Matthew gave his readers.  It was, however, and signficant one.  And only in the resurrection of the Christ could humanity begin to appreciate just how signficant the term was yet to become.

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. (In the NASB New Testament, quotations of the Old Testament are rendered in all capital letters in order to make them easier to identify.)

Christ Was Prophesied in Mystery but Revealed in Glory

In the closing to his letter to the believers in Rome (Romans 16:25-27), the apostle Paul wrote that God’s Messiah had been prophesied in mysterious fashion only to be finally revealed in Jesus of Nazareth.  That is, the promises about God’s Son, which had been enigmatic when given, were made clear when fulfilled.

We do not find in the Old Testament prophecies that read like this:  “There will be a son of a carpenter named Jesus who will do miracles, be rejected by the chief priests of Israel and crucified Pontius Pilate and the Romans, and then raised from the dead on the third day.”  The prophets did not prophesy in this way.  Rather, the prophets’ words were like puzzle pieces – a gigantic riddle – whose answer only became apparent once the prophecies were fulfilled.

For a specific example, see Divergent Old Testament Prophecies Converge in Jesus of Nazareth

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. (In the NASB New Testament, quotations of the Old Testament are rendered in all capital letters in order to make them easier to identify.)

Isaiah 63:9

Isaiah 63:9 In all their affliction He was afflicted,
And the angel of His presence saved them;
In His love and in His mercy He redeemed them,
And He lifted them and carried them all the days of old.

In His crucifixion and death, Jesus was certainly afflicted as we are – and more so than most.  The “angel of His presence” also refers to Jesus.  He came as a man and was raised as an angel, yet He is more than a a man and more than an angel.  In His love and mercy He redeems us and lifts us from death.  In fact, He lifts us to heaven!

See Jesus in this verse, for truly the Old Testament is about Him (The Old Testament (that is, the Hebrew Bible) Is About Jesus Christ).

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. (In the NASB New Testament, quotations of the Old Testament are rendered in all capital letters in order to make them easier to identify.)

Isaiah 59:16

Isaiah 59:16 And He saw that there was no man,
And was astonished that there was no one to intercede;
Then His own arm brought salvation to Him,
And His righteousness upheld Him.

Jesus of Nazareth was God’s “own arm.”  That is, God came to earth as a man in order to redeem all humanity.  There was “no one to intercede” for Him, so He interceded for Himself!  What a great and wonderful God!

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

Ezekiel 37:24

Ezekiel 37:24 “My servant David will be king over them, and they will all have one shepherd; and they will walk in My ordinances and keep My statutes and observe them.

Do you recognize Jesus of Nazareth being prophesied in this verse?  Read John 10 and see how Jesus describes Himself as this shepherd.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

Ezekiel 21:27

Ezekiel 21:27 ‘A ruin, a ruin, a ruin, I will make it. This also will be no more until He comes whose right it is, and I will give it to Him.’

“Until He comes,” is a reference to Messiah.  This prophecy of Ezekiel is reminiscent of Jacob’s prophecy of Messiah found in Genesis [emphasis added]:

Genesis 49:10 “The scepter shall not depart from Judah,
Nor the ruler’s staff from between his feet,
Until Shiloh comes,
And to him shall be the obedience of the peoples.

It also reminds us of what the woman at the well in Sychar said to Jesus about the Messiah, not knowing it was the person to whom she was speaking:

John 4:25 The woman *said to Him, “I know that Messiah is coming (He who is called Christ); when that One comes, He will declare all things to us.”

So much was Messiah referred to as “the One who comes” that John the Baptist asked Jesus if He was “the Coming One”  (the NASB of Matthew 11:3 translates the expression as “the Expected One” but in the margin you’ll see that the literal rendering is “the Coming One”).

The prophecy of Ezekiel above also links with this one from Daniel:

Daniel 7:13 “I kept looking in the night visions,
And behold, with the clouds of heaven
One like a Son of Man was coming,
And He came up to the Ancient of Days
And was presented before Him.

Everything in the plan of God was looking forward to when He comes.  Well…He has come!

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

Hosea 3:5

Hosea 3:5 Afterward the sons of Israel will return and seek the LORD their God and David their king; and they will come trembling to the LORD and to His goodness in the last days.

Hosea is prophesying in this verse.  He is prophesying of Messiah.  Messiah was David their king.  That is, Messiah was the great descendant of David promised by God.  By His resurrection from the dead and seating at God’s right hand, He became the Lord as well.  Jesus of Nazareth is that Messiah.  It is Jesus who this verse has in view.  That is, God, through His Holy Spirit, inspired Hosea to write these words hundreds of years before Jesus was born to Mary.  This is the way of God: to promise…and then to perform, for He is faithful.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

Jeremiah 30:9

Jeremiah 30:9 ‘But they shall serve the LORD their God and David their king, whom I will raise up for them.

This is the kind of verse which Paul, Apollos, and others would have used to convince fellow Jews that the crucifixion and resurection of the Galilean Jesus was in fact an outworking of the predetermined plan of God (Acts 2:23; 17:2-3; 18:28).  Jesus was “David” because He was a descendant of David according to the flesh.  Being the “son of God” according to Psalm 2 (Acts 13:33), Jesus was the king of Israel (John 1:49).  That He was “raised up” is, of course, the prophecy of His resurrection from the dead.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

Jeremiah 23:6

Jeremiah 23:6 “In His days Judah will be saved,
And Israel will dwell securely;
And this is His name by which He will be called,
‘The LORD our righteousness.’

This verse continues the theme begun in Jeremiah 23:5 – that is, the theme of Messiah.  Thus the “His days” are “Messiah’s days.”  And we know that the Lord Jesus is our righteousness because He is the propitiation for our sins, and not for ours only but for those of the whole world (1 John 2:2).

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted.

Jeremiah 23:5

Jeremiah 23:5 “Behold, the days are coming,” declares the LORD,
“When I will raise up for David a righteous Branch;
And He will reign as king and act wisely
And do justice and righteousness in the land.

Jesus of Nazareth was a descendant of David, and thus heir to the messianic promises (primarily to Abraham and his descendant David).  Jesus is “the righteous Branch” and was, of course, “raised up” from the dead three days after being crucified.  He is the king of the kingdom of God, which came on time late in the 1st Century (Jesus Christ Has Already Come Again).

The King of the kingdom of God “acts wisely and does justice and righteousness” throughout His realm.  Blessed be His name!

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

Zechariah 14:9

Zechariah 14:9 And the LORD will be king over all the earth; in that day the LORD will be the only one, and His name the only one.

Who is the Lord who would be “king over all the earth?”  Messiah – Jesus of Nazareth, Son of David.  He is “the only one,” and “His name is the only one.”

This is the kingdom of God:  the lordship of Christ.  Do not allow yourself to be misled from the simplicity of it.

2 Corinthians 11:2 For I am jealous for you with a godly jealousy; for I betrothed you to one husband, so that to Christ I might present you as a pure virgin.
2 Corinthians 11:3 But I am afraid that, as the serpent deceived Eve by his craftiness, your minds will be led astray from the simplicity and purity of devotion to Christ.
2 Corinthians 11:4 For if one comes and preaches another Jesus whom we have not preached, or you receive a different spirit which you have not received, or a different gospel which you have not accepted, you bear this beautifully.

The kingdom of God has come, and Jesus is its king!  His is the name above every other name (Ephesians 1:21; Philippians 2:9).

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

2 Chronicles 9:23

2 Chronicles 9:23 And all the kings of the earth were seeking the presence of Solomon, to hear his wisdom which God had put in his heart.

Should we not seek the presence of the Prince of Peace, Jesus Christ, for whom the great King Solomon is but a type?  If the Queen of Sheba traveled hundreds of miles to hear the wisdom of Solomon shouldn’t be be willing to travel a few feet to pray and seek His face?

After all, Solomon had great wisdom but “all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge” are hidden in Christ (Colossians 2:3).

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted.

2 Chronicles 9:22

2 Chronicles 9:22 So King Solomon became greater than all the kings of the earth in riches and wisdom.

Jesus was the greater “King Solomon” who became greater than all who were before Him.  The “riches” He had were His inheritance in the saints and the wisdom He had was the wisdom of God.  He is “the King of Kings and the Lord of Lords” (Revelation 19:16).

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

2 Chronicles 7:11

2 Chronicles 7:11 Thus Solomon finished the house of the LORD and the king’s palace, and successfully completed all that he had planned on doing in the house of the LORD and in his palace.

Solomon being a type of Christ, this verse prophesies that Jesus would complete the promise of the new heavens and new earth, which would provide a home for the resurrected dead.  As Jesus Himself said, “I go to prepare a place for you” (John 14:2).  And as Isaiah said:

Isaiah 65:17 “For behold, I create new heavens and a new earth;
And the former things will not be remembered or come to mind.

This was completed in the coming of the kingdom of God (Jesus Christ Has Already Come Again).  Thus, Jesus finished what He started.  He kept His promise.  The dead now rise to heaven (Everyone Is Going to Heaven).  “Solomon” thus finished “the house of the Lord and His palace.”

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

2 Chronicles 2:11

2 Chronicles 2:11 Then Huram, king of Tyre, answered in a letter sent to Solomon: “Because the LORD loves His people, He has made you king over them.”

We know that Solomon, being the son of David, is a type of Christ.  The name Solomon means “peace” and Jesus is, of course, “the Prince of Peace” (Isaiah 9:6).  In this verse it is prophesied that Jesus was made king over God’s people because God loves His people.  That is, Jesus was not made king for Jesus’ sake.  Nor was He made king for God’s sake.  Rather Jesus was made king for the people’s sake.

Obedience doesn’t do anything to improve God status.  It does, however, improve our status.  Therefore, we should always be thankful for the kingdom of God.  It was instituted for our sake, not His.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

Esther 10:3

Esther 10:3 For Mordecai the Jew was second only to King Ahasuerus, and great among the Jews and in favor with his many kinsmen, one who sought the good of his people and one who spoke for the welfare of his whole nation.

Like Esther 9:4, this verse foreshadows the Messiah.  In the New Testament, Jesus Christ was second only to God the Father.  He was great among those who were Jews at heart (Romans 2:28-29).  He sought the good of His people, who were God’s people.  He truly spoke for the welfare of His whole nation.

Ponder this verse and let the Spirit of God refresh your heart with thoughts of Christ.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

Esther 9:4

Esther 9:4 Indeed, Mordecai was great in the king’s house, and his fame spread throughout all the provinces; for the man Mordecai became greater and greater.

Mordecai is a type of Christ.  Christ was great in the house of God, performing more miracles than anyone before Him  – so many that the apostle John said that they couldn’t all be written down.  Jesus’ fame spread throughout all Israel, then throughout the whole Mediterranean basin, and then throughout the whole world.  He became greater and greater – so much so that Isaiah could say of Him:

Isaiah 9:7 There will be no end to the increase of His government or of peace…

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

Psalm 21:8

Psalm 21:8 Your hand will find out all your enemies;
Your right hand will find out those who hate you.

Jesus of Nazareth was God’s “right hand man.”  And Jesus certainly found out God’s enemies – by personal experience!  That is, those who hated God in their hearts took it out on Jesus.

Jesus Christ has been a polarizing figure from the beginning.  He was then; He still is now.  Those who truly love God, love Jesus.  And those who despise God, despise Jesus.

Note that the people who hated Jesus did not think that they hated God.  They just did not know their own hearts.  Otherwise, they would not have crucified Him.

Jesus of Nazareth is a proxy for God.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

Stop Making Idols Out of Relics

2 Kings 18:4 [Hezekiah] removed the high places and broke down the sacred pillars and cut down the Asherah. He also broke in pieces the bronze serpent that Moses had made, for until those days the sons of Israel burned incense to it; and it was called Nehushtan.

It seems God’s people are forever holding on to relics from God’s past activities and making present-day idols of them – thus causing themselves to miss God’s current activities.  This passage from 2 Kings is an example of just such behavior.  The original incident to which it refers can be found in Numbers 21:7-9.

The most common relic that people are worshiping today is church.  Whether it’s the church as a building or as an institution or as a social structure with human leadership, in all cases it is idolatry.  God is just as dishonored by this idolatry as He was by the Israelites’ worship of a bronze serpent that had been preserved beyond its useful life.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

The “Lost” Book

2 Kings 22:8-20 tells the story of how the “lost” book was “found.”  It begins this way:

 2 Kings 22:8 Then Hilkiah the high priest said to Shaphan the scribe, “I have found the book of the law in the house of the LORD.” And Hilkiah gave the book to Shaphan who read it.

The book was the Law of Moses which the nation had been forgetting.  And because Israel had been forgetting Moses’ Law, it was experiencing all the curses promised to the nation if they forsook it.  Thus, finding the book meant finding an explanation for why the nation was in the sorry state that it was in.

Similarly, the Bible is largely a “lost” book to Christendom today.  Denominational and ideological dogmas have taken the place of reading and studying the words of God’s prophets and apostles.  As a result, the word of God is made to be of no effect.  It’s tragic.

Read the pages of Scripture and let the Holy Spirit who inspired it bring you understanding that you might repent and live according to it.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

The Scarlet Thread

There is a “scarlet thread” running from one end of the Bible to the other.  It is the blood that has flowed to bring the truth to us in modernity.

All the prophets who were slain for their faith – from Abel to Zechariah – testify to us about the truth of God.  Then, in New Testament times, Jesus Himself suffered death by crucifixion.  And post-biblical tradition tells us that only one of the twelve apostles lived to a natural death, all the rest being martyred, and usually in some particularly cruel fashion.

This scarlet thread bears witnesses to the veracity of those prophets and apostles – and of the Savior Himself.

Let us never read the Bible without an appreciation for the price that was paid to bring it to us.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

Exodus 33:21-23

Exodus 33:21 Then the LORD said, “Behold, there is a place by Me, and you shall stand there on the rock;
Exodus 33:22 and it will come about, while My glory is passing by, that I will put you in the cleft of the rock and cover you with My hand until I have passed by.
Exodus 33:23 “Then I will take My hand away and you shall see My back, but My face shall not be seen.”

When God walked the earth as Jesus of Nazareth, He did not reveal Himself to be God.  He lived with all the limitations of a human being.  Humanity was protected during that time.  Only after He had passed this way were we able to realize that God had truly been among us.  “Immanuel” was far more intimate that we had ever thought our hoped.

Matthew 1:23 “BEHOLD, THE VIRGIN SHALL BE WITH CHILD AND SHALL BEAR A SON, AND THEY SHALL CALL HIS NAME IMMANUEL,” which translated means, “GOD WITH US.”

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. (In the NASB New Testament, quotations of the Old Testament are rendered in all capital letters in order to make them easier to identify.)

Numbers 20:16

Numbers 20:16 ‘But when we cried out to the LORD, He heard our voice and sent an angel and brought us out from Egypt…

This verse foreshadows the deliverance God gave us through Jesus Christ.  That is, He sent His messenger Jesus before us.  This Jesus died for our sins and then was raised from the dead to the right hand of God.  From there He brought all humanity to Himself.  As Paul wrote, quoting the 68th psalm:

Ephesians 4:8 Therefore it says,
“WHEN HE ASCENDED ON HIGH,
HE LED CAPTIVE A HOST OF CAPTIVES…

Or as the prophet Micah put it:

Micah 2:13 “The breaker goes up before them;
They break out, pass through the gate and go out by it.
So their king goes on before them,
And the LORD at their head.”

Of course, the messenger God “sent” was God Himself, becoming a man and then becoming a resurrected man – that is, an angel (see Matthew 22:30; Mark 12:25; and Luke 20:36).  If God could become a man, it should not seem strange that He could also become an angel – especially on the way to His being restored to His place as God.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. (In the NASB New Testament, quotations of the Old Testament are rendered in all capital letters in order to make them easier to identify.)

Is Jesus a False Prophet?

Is Jesus a false prophet?  Perish the thought!  It’s an entirely repugnant thought.

Why then do I raise such a thought?  Because those who deny the fulfillment of Jesus’ promises of a coming kingdom are inadvertently begging for Him to be labeled false.  Remember that Moses said:

Deuteronomy 18:22 “When a prophet speaks in the name of the LORD, if the thing does not come about or come true, that is the thing which the LORD has not spoken. The prophet has spoken it presumptuously; you shall not be afraid of him.

Therefore, if Jesus’ words about the imminent coming of the kingdom of God in the 1st Century A.D. are today deemed to be wrong, then Jesus is, in effect, being labeled a prophet whose prophecy did not come true.

Yet His prophecy did come true!  Jesus Christ did come again – just exactly as He had promised.  Many people simply misunderstood His promise.  They expected Him to come in earthly or worldly glory, but Jesus had already turned down that kind of glory when He was tempted by Satan in the desert (Matthew 4, Luke 4).  No, Jesus was promising to come in heavenly glory.  How could He have made this more clear?  He kept calling it “the kingdom of God” and “the kingdom of heaven” – not “the kingdom of man” or “the kingdom of flesh.”

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

The Miracles of Jesus Were Greater than the Miracles of Moses

The signs performed by God through Jesus were greater than the signs performed by God through Moses for the reason that the ministry of Jesus was greater than the ministry of Moses.

Moses’ ministry was great.  There’s no denying, or even downplaying, that.  However, the ministry of Jesus – the second Moses – was greater.

Moses said, “God shall raise up a prophet like me from among your brethren” (Deuteronomy 18:15).  For this reason we can call Jesus “the second Moses.”

Moses was a steward over God’s house but Jesus is the heir over God’s house.

Moreover, Moses tended a house but Jesus built a house.

God gave more miracles through Jesus in order to testify that His work was even more important than the work of Moses.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted.