Genesis 25:5

Genesis 25:5 Now Abraham gave all that he had to Isaac;

As Abraham gave all that he had to his only begotten son Isaac, so God the Father gave all that He had to His only begotten Son.

Therefore, let us honor the Son with the Father’s glory.  That is, let us honor the Son as we would honor the Father (John 5:22-23).

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

Deuteronomy 14:1 – We Are Sons of the Lord

Deuteronomy 14:1 “You are the sons of the LORD your God…

Who is the Lord?  Jesus.

How did He become God?  He was God before His incarnation, and He returned to that place when He was raised from the dead, taken to heaven, and installed as the king of the kingdom of God.

Is He then our Father?  Yes.

Do the Scriptures support this?  Yes.  Isaiah, for example, says that the Son will be called “Eternal Father.”

Isaiah 9:6 For a child will be born to us, a son will be given to us;
And the government will rest on His shoulders;
And His name will be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God,
Eternal Father, Prince of Peace.

And, as we’ve seen above, Moses writes that the children of Israel are the sons of the Lord.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted.

Isaiah 64:8

Isaiah 64:8 But now, O LORD, You are our Father,
We are the clay, and You our potter;
And all of us are the work of Your hand.

Christians confess that Jesus is Lord.  Why then are they not willing to call Him “Father” as well, as this prophecy of Isaiah does?

Jesus was not revealed as the Father in the New Testament and that is why He is not revealed in those terms there.  Isaiah, however, prophesied that the Messiah would be “the Eternal Father”:

Isaiah 9:6 For a child will be born to us,
a son will be given to us;
And the government will rest on His shoulders;
And His name will be called
Wonderful Counselor,
Mighty God,
Eternal Father,
Prince of Peace.

It all happened in due time.  Specifically, Jesus became the Father once again at the coming of the kingdom (see Whatever Became of Jesus Christ?).  If we’re willing to call Him the “Prince of Peace” should we not also be willing to call Him “Eternal Father”?

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

Numbers 20:16

Numbers 20:16 ‘But when we cried out to the LORD, He heard our voice and sent an angel and brought us out from Egypt…

This verse foreshadows the deliverance God gave us through Jesus Christ.  That is, He sent His messenger Jesus before us.  This Jesus died for our sins and then was raised from the dead to the right hand of God.  From there He brought all humanity to Himself.  As Paul wrote, quoting the 68th psalm:

Ephesians 4:8 Therefore it says,
“WHEN HE ASCENDED ON HIGH,
HE LED CAPTIVE A HOST OF CAPTIVES…

Or as the prophet Micah put it:

Micah 2:13 “The breaker goes up before them;
They break out, pass through the gate and go out by it.
So their king goes on before them,
And the LORD at their head.”

Of course, the messenger God “sent” was God Himself, becoming a man and then becoming a resurrected man – that is, an angel (see Matthew 22:30; Mark 12:25; and Luke 20:36).  If God could become a man, it should not seem strange that He could also become an angel – especially on the way to His being restored to His place as God.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. (In the NASB New Testament, quotations of the Old Testament are rendered in all capital letters in order to make them easier to identify.)

Deuteronomy 31:14

Deuteronomy 31:14 Then the LORD said to Moses, “Behold, the time for you to die is near; call Joshua, and present yourselves at the tent of meeting, that I may commission him.” So Moses and Joshua went and presented themselves at the tent of meeting.

As with Deuteronomy 31:3, this verse foreshadows Jesus Christ.

It parallels the vision of Daniel 7:13-14 wherein the Son of Man comes up to the Ancient of Days to receive a kingdom.

All this foreshadows the handing over of the kingdom from Father to Son, as referenced by Jesus in many places including Matthew 11:27 and John 5:22-23.

Of course, we know that this Father became the Son so that He might become the Father once again (Isaiah 9:6), just as a tree gives a seed so that the seed may become a tree:

John 12:24 “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless a grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies, it remains alone; but if it dies, it bears much fruit.
John 12:25 “He who loves his life loses it, and he who hates his life in this world will keep it to life eternal.

As it is for us, so it was with God.  Blessed be His glorious name!

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

Isaiah 63:16

Isaiah 63:16 For You are our Father, though Abraham does not know us
And Israel does not recognize us.
You, O LORD, are our Father,
Our Redeemer from of old is Your name.

The Lord Jesus is our Father.  Isaiah was prophesying that  this would be the case.  Earlier, Isaiah had  prophesied that He would be the “eternal Father” in this passage:

Isaiah 9:6 For a child will be born to us, a son will be given to us;
And the government will rest on His shoulders;
And His name will be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God,
Eternal Father, Prince of Peace.

Thus, our Lord is our Father.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

2 Chronicles 6:8-9

2 Chronicles 6:8 “But the LORD said to my father David, ‘Because it was in your heart to build a house for My name, you did well that it was in your heart.
2 Chronicles 6:9 ‘Nevertheless you shall not build the house, but your son who will be born to you, he shall build the house for My name.’

It was not God the Father who built the eternal house for the name of God, for He was a God of bloodshed, but it was God the Son who built the everlasting house of the name of God that we call the kingdom of God.  The Son was of peace and shed no blood.

There was no evil in the Father just as there was no evil in the Son.  They are the same, for the Father became the Son.  But the Father was forced to worked through the hardness of men’s hearts in  the evil age ruled by Satan.  In the new age, Satan has been cut out of the loop – and for this reason Jesus never had to take up the sword as David did.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. (In the NASB New Testament, quotations of the Old Testament are rendered in all capital letters in order to make them easier to identify.)

1 Chronicles 23:1

1 Chronicles 23:1 Now when David reached old age, he made his son Solomon king over Israel.

And when God the Father became the Ancient of Days He turned over the kingdom to the Son of Man:

Daniel 7:13 “I kept looking in the night visions,
And behold, with the clouds of heaven
One like a Son of Man was coming,
And He came up to the Ancient of Days
And was presented before Him.
Daniel 7:14 “And to Him was given dominion,
Glory and a kingdom,
That all the peoples, nations and men of every language
Might serve Him.
His dominion is an everlasting dominion
Which will not pass away;
And His kingdom is one
Which will not be destroyed.

Know therefore that the transition from David to Solomon foreshadows the transition from God to Son.  For this reason the Son is called “the heir of all things” in Hebrews 1:2.  If He is heir of “all things” then there is no thing for which He is not heir.  All that had been the Father’s became the Son’s at the coming of the kingdom.

All devotion that we would give God should be directed to the Son.  This is what God asks.  This is what He has commanded.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. (In the NASB New Testament, quotations of the Old Testament are rendered in all capital letters in order to make them easier to identify.)

1 Chronicles 22:17

1 Chronicles 22:17 David also commanded all the leaders of Israel to help his son Solomon…

This verse foreshadows the direction God the Father gave his servants to follow Jesus:

Mark 9:7 Then a cloud formed, overshadowing them, and a voice came out of the cloud, “This is My beloved Son, listen to Him!”

For just as all things were handed from the Father to Jesus, so all things had been handed over to Solomon by his father David:

Matthew 11:27 “All things have been handed over to Me by My Father…

Thus in 1 Chronicles 22:17, David is a type of God the Father and Solomon is a type of the Son of God.  Thus Solomon’s name means “peace” and Jesus “is our peace” (Ephesians 2:14).

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

I’m Not Going to Call God by a Name That the Prophets and Apostles Don’t Use

If the prophets and the apostles don’t call God “trinity,” why should we?

The prophets and apostles called God by many names.  Many names.  Are there not enough of these names that we have to add our own?

We are warned against adding to, or taking away from, the word of God (Deuteronomy 4:2; 12:32; Proverbs 30:5, 6; Revelation 22:18, 19).  Why then do some so boldly add “trinity” to the list of names by which God has called Himself through His servants, the apostles and prophets through whom we have the Scriptures?

We ought to stand in fear of a holy God and use only the names for Him that He has given us.

Double-mindedness Supports Trinitarianism

God takes a dim view of our being double-minded.  See Psalm 119:113; James 1:8 and 4:8.

Double-mindedness is obviously a confused state of thinking.  It results from an unwillingness to take a stand.  There’s a classic case of it revealed in Matthew 21:23-27 when the Pharisees refuse to take a stand on whether or not John the Baptist was sent from God.

The Pharisees wanted to have it both ways.  They wanted to be able to affirm John the Baptist before the crowds who revered him, while they simultaneously condemned him in private for giving his approval to Jesus.

That sort of contradictory thinking would allow a person to tolerate and even promote a concept like the Trinity – which is obviously a self-contradictory concept.  If you’re used to being double-minded, however, contradiction doesn’t seem to be much of a problem.

I’m not suggesting that the Pharisees came up with the idea of God being a trinity – just that their way of thinking did.

By contrast, God desires that we be single-mindedly devoted to Christ.  See 2 Corinthians 11:3 and 2 John 1:9.

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. (In the NASB New Testament, quotations of the Old Testament are rendered in all capital letters in order to make them easier to identify.)

How Shall Jesus Have a Name Above Every Name Unless He Is the Father?

Philippians 2:9-11 says that Jesus has been granted a name that is above every name.  This was only fully accomplished when Jesus was revealed as the Father in the new age – that is, the age in which we live.

For if “the Father” is a name above Jesus, how can it be said that Jesus has the highest name?

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. (In the NASB New Testament, quotations of the Old Testament are rendered in all capital letters in order to make them easier to identify.)

Jesus Came in the Glory of His Father

In Matthew 16:27, Jesus promised that He would “come in the glory of His Father.”  This, of course, is exactly what He did.

Why did so many people miss it?  After all, that sounds like a lot of glory – how then could folks miss it?  For the same reason that they missed the glory when the Father had it.

Stated another way, why do people expect Jesus to come in earthly glory when He specifically said He was coming in the glory of His Father?  The Father’s glory, of course, transcends the physical creation.  By that glory, the physical creation is sustained.  Therefore, the glory in which Jesus came was no different from the glory that surrounded the Father through all the ages before Jesus came.  It is a spiritual glory, seen with spiritual eyes.

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

“The Glory of His Inheritance in the Saints”

Ephesians 1:18 mentions “the glory of His inheritance in the saints.”  The Messiah inherited the saints from the Father.  They were a pledge (or down payment or early installment, if you prefer) of the inheritance that the Father was giving the Son.  (Regarding this inheritance, see yesterday’s post.)

“Saints” means “holy ones” – those set apart for God.  Prior to the ministry of Jesus of Nazareth, God had known those Israelites whose hearts were truly His.  However, only with the ministry of the Nazarene were those holy ones revealed to others.  That is, people like John the Baptist, Peter, James, John, and others had been true Jews at heart.  That’s why they were drawn to the carpenter from Galilee.  These holy ones were drawn to the light of Christ according to John 3:19-21.  That is, they were people who were unafraid of the light because they sought to live their lives for the approval of God and not the approval of men.

The Messiah was a polarizer of people.  A more precise way of seeing this, however, is to recognize that it is fundamentally God who polarizes people and the Messiah merely brought that polarization to light (Luke 2:34-35).  That is, the people who loved God loved the one sent by God.  Those who rejected God rejected the one sent by God.

Therefore, those Jews who loved Jesus loved God before they loved Jesus.  You can also say that they loved Jesus because they loved God.  For this reason, God’s saints were passed to Jesus.  Jesus inherited those saints…and it was a glorious thing that He did.  This is just one aspect of “the glory of His inheritance in the saints.”

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

Everything That Was the Father’s Is Now the Son’s

Everything that was the Father’s is now the Son’s.

Remember that in Matthew 11:27 and Luke 10:22, Jesus said, “All things have been handed over to Me by My Father.”  Remember also that in John 5:22, Jesus said that the Father “has given all judgment to the Son.”  And then there is, of course, Hebrews 1:2 which says that the Son had been “appointed heir of all things.” [emphasis added]

Thus through Christ – the Son of God – was the following prophecy of Isaiah fulfilled:

 Isaiah 22:24 “So they will hang on him all the glory of his father’s house…

Therefore, all that was due the Father – that is, worship, reverence, awe, fear, respect, honor, obedience, devotion, trust, praise, glory, faithfulness, and more – is now owed to the Son.

The Trinity concept misses the point.  It misrepresents God and obscures the inheritance that passed from father to son.  The Son inherited all from the Father.  Therefore, let us regard the Son as the Father.

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. (In the NASB New Testament, quotations of the Old Testament are rendered in all capital letters in order to make them easier to identify.)

Honor the Son Even as Our Ancestors Honored the Father

John 5:22 “For not even the Father judges anyone, but He has given all judgment to the Son,
John 5:23 so that all will honor the Son even as they honor the Father. He who does not honor the Son does not honor the Father who sent Him.

These words of Jesus indicate that as He was to receive all judgment from the Father, so that the faithful would come to honor the Son as they honored the Father.  Therefore, as Abraham and Isaac and Jacob honored the Father – with faith, obedience, and worship – so we should honor the Son – with faith, obedience, and worship.

Note that Jesus does not say we should honor a trinity as we honored the Father.  Rather, He says we should honor the Son as we honored the Father.  Thus trinitarianism is a departure from Scripture and it is a distraction from Christ.  It is anti-Christ in effect, and a departure from the simplicity and purity of devotion to Christ that the apostles counseled (2 Corinthians 11:3).

Whatever honor was given the Father is now due to Christ.  Let us therefore be fully devoted to Christ as Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob were fully devoted to God.

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. (In the NASB New Testament, quotations of the Old Testament are rendered in all capital letters in order to make them easier to identify.)

If Jesus Is God…

If Jesus is God, what is going on at His baptism and the Mount of Transfiguration?

First, let’s recognize that the Old Testament is Jesus’ biography – written in advance.  In Acts 2:23, after forty days of instruction from Jesus (Luke 24:27, 44), the apostle Peter reported to the Jewish crowds assembled in Jerusalem for the Feast of Pentecost that the crucifixion of Jesus by the hands of godless men had been part “the predetermined plan and foreknowledge of God.”  In other words, evil men had not spoiled the plan of God – they had participated in it.  God’s Messiah had not be thwarted.  On the contrary, He used the sins of men to overcome the sins of men.  The life, death, and resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth had been planned.  In the light of this understanding, let’s take a look back at Jesus’ baptism and transfiguration.

Both at His baptism (Matthew 3:17; Mark 1:11; Luke 3:22) and at His transfiguration (Matthew 17:5; Mark 9:7; Luke 9:35), the texts say that “a voice” came from above.  I don’t think that God is so shorthanded that He has to do His own announcements.  Like any great king, He has servants to carry out His wishes and make His words known.  Thus I take it that an angel of some kind was proclaiming the words.  It doesn’t seem too hard to imagine that as part of “the predetermined plan of God” that these announcements were planned to be made at certain time and/or when certain conditions were met.

Before leaving heaven for His transformation into a human being through conception in Mary’s womb, God made all the necessary arrangements associated with His plan for the redemption of creation – including the use of generations of prophets beginning with Moses to document the plan (in what we call the Old Testament)…so that it could be read to Him once He became a human being – eventually even being able to read it Himself (Luke 4:16, 17).  Thus God arranged for the messages from heaven long before they took place.  In short, God had left Himself these messages for when He would be Jesus.  This is true not just of these voices but of the entirety of the Old Testament.

 

Psalm 45:16 – The Son Comes to Take the Place of the Father

Psalm 45:16 In place of your fathers will be your sons…

Thus, in place of God the Father…is God the Son.

For this reason, the voice from heaven said:

Mark 9:7 Then a cloud formed, overshadowing them, and a voice came out of the cloud, “This is My beloved Son, listen to Him!”

Why then aren’t we listening to the Son?

If this idea is not clear to you, see this post: There Is No Trinity; There Is Christ

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

2 Samuel 5:2 (1 Chronicles 11:2) – Christ or the Trinity?

2 Samuel 5:2 “Previously, when Saul was king over us, you were the one who led Israel out and in. And the LORD said to you, ‘You will shepherd My people Israel, and you will be a ruler over Israel.'”

(1 Chronicles 11:2 says practically the same thing.)

Even those Trinitarians who seek godliness know that the Son is the One who takes the lead and gets things done.  Thus, even though Trinitarians proclaim the Father, it is the Son who the faithful ones follow.  No one knows the Father except through the Son anyway (Matthew 11:27).  Devotion to Christ (2 Corinthians 11:3) has always been what has advanced the kingdom of God.

The organized church has always had within its shadow those who truly sought the kingdom of God.  These souls brought down the blessings of heaven upon us not because they were part of the organized church, but rather in spite of the fact that they were part of the organized church.

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

If Messiah Is Not a Father, Why Does Scripture Speak of His Sons?

Psalm 89:27 makes reference to the Messiah as “the firstborn” and “the highest of the kings of the earth.”  As this psalm continues to describe this great one, Psalm 89:30 says, “If his sons forsake My law…”  Thus Messiah must have sons.  This should not be considered strange for how could the seed of Abraham miss out on the blessing of fatherhood?

If the blessing of Abraham, which was rightly inherited by Messiah, didn’t include fatherhood,  wouldn’t that blessing be missing its most emblematic element?

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

When You Say to Jesus in the Morning, “Our Father Who Art in Heaven” You Are Staking Out a Path for the Day

As Jesus took up His cross, so you take up your cross daily and follow Him.

Luke 9:23 And He was saying to them all, “If anyone wishes to come after Me, he must deny himself, and take up his cross daily and follow Me.

Jesus also said:

Matthew 6:34 “So do not worry about tomorrow; for tomorrow will care for itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own.

Thus, a one-day-at-a-time approach to following Jesus is best.

Trinitarians get no direction at all from praying “Our Father who art in heaven” because the Father of Jesus is someone that have never seen and can therefore never imitate.  Jesus Himself said:

John 5:19 …the Son can do nothing of Himself, unless it is something He sees the Father doing; for whatever the Father does, these things the Son also does in like manner.

How can a son imitate a father he has never seen doing anything?

Trinitarians actually can receive direction from God, but they receive in spite of the trinitarian concept – not because of it.  Trinitarianism put a believer in a confused mental state before God.  God is not a God of confusion.

As Jesus was perfected through what He suffered (Hebrews 2:10), so we are perfected through the sufferings we endure for His sake (Romans 8:17).

Thus it is through the path of the cross, cut for us by Jesus Himself, that we can reach heavenly glory.  Without Him as our Father in heaven, we have no vision of how to live this earthly life.  And “without a vision, the people perish” (Proverbs 29:18 King James Version).

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted.  

When You Say, “Our Father Who Art in Heaven” You Are Addressing Jesus

Jesus is our father – our progenitor, the one from whom we come (spiritually speaking).  He died and has been raised to heaven.  Thus He is “our father who is in heaven.”

If you keep this in mind whenever you pray or call to heaven, you will be filling your mind with true and helpful thoughts…like these:

You will be remembering that your father walked your path before you.  Your father is therefore your forerunner (Hebrews 6:20) that you may run with endurance the race set before you (Hebrews 12:1-2).

You will be remembering that you, too, have a destination before you.  One day you will be in heaven where you will give an account of the decisions you made here.  And you will be giving this account to Jesus – the one who made human decisions here before you were born.

You will be remembering that you share Jesus as father with others, for it is “our” father whom you address.

You will be remembering the resurrection which is so utterly essential to the faith bequeathed to us (1 Corinthians 15:12-19).

There is something blessed about filling your mind with thoughts of your resurrected Lord whenever you think or say “Our Father who art in heaven.”

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted.  

Seeing Jesus in Judges 5:31

Judges 5:31 “Thus let all Your enemies perish, O LORD;
But let those who love Him be like the rising of the sun in its might.”…

Who showed more love for God than Jesus?  (Asked another way, who did a better job of obeying the greatest commandment?)

And who of His enemies did not perish?  (Was not Jerusalem itself destroyed in 70 AD?)

And who rose like the sun in its might?  (Is He not called “the Sun of Righteousness” who rose?)

Jesus our Lord is the one who loved God with all His heart and soul and mind and strength, and who rose, and whose enemies have perished.

As He loved the Lord His God, let us love Him – the Lord our God.

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

Psalm 68:5

Psalm 68:5 A father of the fatherless and a judge for the widows,
Is God in His holy habitation.

How is Jesus “a father of the fatherless?”  Did He not promise:

John 14:18 “I will not leave you as orphans; I will come to you.

And how is He “a judge for the widows?”  Was it not said:

Acts 10:42 “And He ordered us to preach to the people, and solemnly to testify that this is the One who has been appointed by God as Judge of the living and the dead.

And thus James could remind in his letter about the needs of orphans and widows (1:27) and later warn about the coming of the Judge who would deliver them:

James 5:9 Do not complain, brethren, against one another, so that you yourselves may not be judged; behold, the Judge is standing right at the door.

Truly the Lord Jesus is “a father to the fatherless and a judge for the widows.”

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted.  

The Trinity Is an Idol; John Warned Us to Guard Ourselves Against Idols

1 John 5:21 warns its readers to guard themselves against idols.

One such idol, which had not appeared on the scene when John wrote the letter, is the concept of God as a “trinity” (or as being “triune”).  This is a false conception of God, intellectually contrived in a period of time when people did not believe the Lord had kept His promise to come in His kingdom during the lifetime of His disciples (Matthew 10:23; 16:28; 24:34).

Idols falsely represent God, and are usually contrived in periods of doubt and unbelief when our hearts faint from waiting on the Lord and are drawn back to the things of earth.

God consistently spoke against idols throughout Old Testament times.  The Old Testament age was a polytheistic age and the New Testament age is a monotheistic age.  Therefore, idolatry manifests itself differently in this age.  Idols are still distractions to worship of the true God, but can be more subtle.

The Trinity is an intellectual idol.  It imports philosophical vocabulary with a religious veneer, but it is altogether foreign to biblical truth.  Its one virtue is that it affirms the deity of Christ, but it is not necessary to embrace an idol in order to embrace the deity of Christ.

Idols rob God of attention and glory.  Put away the idol of trinity so that you might worship, follow, and obey Jesus Christ our Lord.

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

Revelation 2:4 – Have You Left Your First Love?

Revelation 2:4 ‘But I have this against you, that you have left your first love.”

Have you left your first love?

Many people have had an encounter with Jesus.  They can remember a time in their lives, maybe even a specific moment, when the grace of Jesus Christ became real to them in a way that it had not been before.  Some of these people will happily describe this experience as having been “born again,” or as the time they were “saved.”  However they describe it, it is memorable to them and precious to them.

When we’ve wandered from that first love, it’s time for us to be called back.  Competing affections have blocked the single-minded devotion to Jesus which began our journey with Him.  Idols came in and clouded our view (1 John 5:21).

One of the most common impediments to single-minded devotion to Christ is the intellectual idol called “the Trinity,” or the idea of “the triune God.”  The very words are spoken in solemn tones as if the person talking knew what he was talking about.  In such cases, these words of Paul become relevant:

2 Corinthians 11:3 But I am afraid that, as the serpent deceived Eve by his craftiness, your minds will be led astray from the simplicity and purity of devotion to Christ.
2 Corinthians 11:4 For if one comes and preaches another Jesus whom we have not preached, or you receive a different spirit which you have not received, or a different gospel which you have not accepted, you bear this beautifully.

The Trinity is not the Jesus who was preached to you and which captured your heart.  It came later, along with other religious and theological baggage which seemed scriptural but really wasn’t.  These encumbrances (Hebrews 12:1-2) have weighed you down and sapped your love for Jesus, diverting it in other directions.

Return to your first love.  As the prophet says:

Isaiah 31:6 Return to Him from whom you have deeply defected…

Let your first love be your last love.  Do not let your love for Christ grow cold (Matthew 24:12), nor let it be parceled out to many lovers (Jeremiah 3:1).

Keep Jesus as the apple of your eye and you will do well (1 John 5:11-13; 2 John 1:9).

For more on keeping Christ as the apple of your eye, see:

There Is No Trinity; There Is Christ

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted.  

The Apostle Paul Proclaimed in the Synagogues of Damascus That Jesus Was “the Son of God”

The story of Paul’s conversion from being a persecutor of Christians to being a proclaimer of Christ is told in Acts 9.  Following that conversion, here is what happened next:

Acts 9:19 …Now for several days he was with the disciples who were at Damascus,
Acts 9:20 and immediately he began to proclaim Jesus in the synagogues, saying, “He is the Son of God.”

That’s the equivalent of Paul saying, “Jesus is the Christ,” or “Jesus is the Messiah.”  It’s clear Paul was not teaching trinitarian theology to his fellow Jews in Damascus.  He was using a term they would all understand.  Scriptures like 2 Samuel 7:14 and Psalm 2 had primed Jews to expect a descendant of David to appear one day and take command.  They called him “messiah,” “king,” or “son of God.”  That this son of God had been raised from the dead and ascended to heaven was a turn of events “exceeding abundantly beyond anything they had asked or thought.”

As soon as Jesus was raised from the dead, and had the chance to explain scriptures like Psalm 110 to the disciples, they realized that Messiah would have a far more exalted status than anyone had anticipated.  Yet it would only become clear with time and God’s revelation that Messiah was God Himself.  Those who formulated the trinity doctrine never fully appreciated this.

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted.  

What Does the Term “Son of God” Mean to You?

When a 21st-century Christian hears the term “Son of God,” the Trinity will usually be one of the thoughts that comes to mind.

When, however, a 1st-century Christian heard the term “Son of God,” he immediately thought “Messiah.”  This is because “Son of God” was a term associated with David’s promised seed who would one day be Israel’s great king (2 Samuel 7:14 and Psalm 2).  The 1st-century Christian never thought “Trinity” because that term did not exist in the 1st-century and they did not think of God in that way.  If, therefore, Jude could write in the 1st Century that he and his contemporaries should defend “the faith once for all delivered to the saints” (Jude 1:3), how could the Trinity be part of it?  And if the Trinity is not part of “the faith once for all delivered to the saints” what gives us the right to add it?

The Scripture is pretty negative about anyone adding to the word of God (Revelation 22:18; Matthew 15:3, 6; 16:6, 11-12).  Let us take heed.

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

 

Elijah and Elisha Show Us How Jesus Became Our Heavenly Father

In 2 Kings 2 we read of Elijah’s departure from Elisha.

When Elijah “went up by a whirlwind to heaven” (verse 11) it typified the upheaval of crucifixion and resurrection that would one day take Jesus to heaven.

Elisha looked up and cried to Elijah, “My father, my father…” (verse 12).  This cry typifies our appropriate reaction to Jesus’ ascension, which allowed Him to become our father in heaven (i.e. heavenly father).

Elisha was devoted to Elijah and sought to imitate him in every way.  Elisha had said that he wanted a double portion of Elijah’s spirit (verse 9).  Elijah said the granting of this request would be contingent on Elisha’s “seeing” Elijah when Elijah was taken from him (verses 10).  Of course, we today “see” Jesus in heaven by faith (2 Corinthians 5:7; Hebrews 12:2).  The stronger our faith, the stronger Christ’s power through us; conversely, the weaker our faith, the wearker His power through us (Matthew 13:58; Mark 6:5).

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted.  

Every Biblical Reference to “Heavenly Father” Is an Allusion to the Resurrection of Jesus

“Your Father who is in heaven”

“Your heavenly Father”

If you think about it, these expressions are generic – almost fill-in-the-blank descriptions.  They are like placeholders.  No name – just a job title and a location.

They aren’t any more specific than to locate this father in heaven.

What was going to happen to Jesus when He died?  He was going to be resurrected from the dead.

Where was His resurrection to lead Him?  To heaven.

Thus, Jesus would become the father of all the righteous, having left them an example to imitate.

John 5:19 Therefore Jesus answered and was saying to them, “Truly, truly, I say to you, the Son can do nothing of Himself, unless it is something He sees the Father doing; for whatever the Father does, these things the Son also does in like manner.

Can you see Jesus’ Father doing anything?  No.  Can you see Jesus doing anything?  Sure; that’s what the gospels are for.  Who then is your father?  Jesus.  Where is He?  Heaven.  What does that make Him?  Your heavenly Father.

Thus every mention of “father in heaven” is an allusion to the resurrected Christ, for as Christ looked to His Father so we are to look to Christ.

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted.  

The Promises of God Are All in the Old Testament; Only the Promises of Christ Are in the New Testament

About all that God says in the New Testament is that people should listen to the Son.  Thus the letter to the Hebrews begins:

Hebrews 1:1 God, after He spoke long ago to the fathers in the prophets in many portions and in many ways,
Hebrews 1:2 in these last days has spoken to us in His Son, whom He appointed heir of all things, through whom also He made the world.

Thus, we should do as the book of Hebrews later says:

Hebrews 12:25 See to it that you do not refuse Him who is speaking…

The Old Testament is about God making promises.  The New Testament is about God keeping them.

The prophets wrote what God promised.  The apostles wrote how God fulfilled what He promised.

Thus all the promises of God are fulfilled in Christ that, going forward from Christ, we might listen only to Christ.  He is indeed, as it says above in Hebrews 1:2, “the heir of all things.”

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

The Costly Cornerstone

The prophet said that this cornerstone we know to be Christ would be costly:

Isaiah 28:16 Therefore thus says the Lord GOD,
“Behold, I am laying in Zion a stone, a tested stone,
A costly cornerstone for the foundation, firmly placed.
He who believes in it will not be disturbed.

David tells us the importance of paying the price for a gift:

1 Chronicles 21:24 But King David said to Ornan, “No, but I will surely buy it for the full price; for I will not take what is yours for the LORD, or offer a burnt offering which costs me nothing.”

(Perhaps the moral of Nathan’s tale in 2 Samuel 12 was still smoldering in David’s conscience.)

In any case, we can go to Jesus to find out how true cost is measured:

Mark 12:41 And He sat down opposite the treasury, and began observing how the people were putting money into the treasury; and many rich people were putting in large sums.
Mark 12:42 A poor widow came and put in two small copper coins, which amount to a cent.
Mark 12:43 Calling His disciples to Him, He said to them, “Truly I say to you, this poor widow put in more than all the contributors to the treasury;
Mark 12:44 for they all put in out of their surplus, but she, out of her poverty, put in all she owned, all she had to live on.”

Thus it’s not how much you pay, but how much you have left after you pay, that counts.  When God gave us Christ, there was nothing left…for He had given us His all.

When you understand this, you will come to see that Christ is the costliest cornerstone there could possibly have been or ever be!

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who  read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted.  

2 Corinthians 11:3

2 Corinthians 11:3 But I am afraid that, as the serpent deceived Eve by his craftiness, your minds will be led astray from the simplicity and purity of devotion to Christ.

Be simply and purely devoted to Christ.  What could be more simple?  What could be more pure?

To follow trinitarian teaching is to be “led astray from the simplicity and purity of devotion to Christ.”

The trinity concept is neither simple nor pure.  It is complicated – hard to understand and hard to follow.

Be devoted to Christ.  Love Him. Imitate Him.  Honor Him.  Christ was God in the flesh.  He is now God in the spirit.

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted.

2 John 1:9

2 John 1:9 Anyone who goes too far and does not abide in the teaching of Christ, does not have God; the one who abides in the teaching, he has both the Father and the Son.

The teaching of Trinity is going too far and not abiding in the teaching of Christ.  Trinitarian doctrine is foreign to Scripture.  To think of God as a trinity is to impose Gentile thinking on Jewish Scripture, to impose philosophical speculations on scriptural truth.

Abide in the teaching of Christ and you will know the truth.  Love Christ, serve Christ, live for Christ, die for Christ.

God became Christ that we might know Him.

If you abide in Christ, you will will find both the Father and the Son.

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted.

1 John 4:14

1 John 4:14 We have seen and testify that the Father has sent the Son to be the Savior of the world.

The Son is the Savior of the world.  The Son is Jesus Christ.  Thus Jesus the Christ is the Savior of the world.  Who is the Savior of the world?  The Christ.

To whom, therefore, should we look for help?  The Son.  He is the Savior.

Let us meditate on the Son.

Let us meditate on the Savior of the world.

He makes all things right.

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted.

Proverbs 30:4

Proverbs 30:4 Who has ascended into heaven and descended?
Who has gathered the wind in His fists?
Who has wrapped the waters in His garment?
Who has established all the ends of the earth?
What is His name or His son’s name?
Surely you know!

Surely we do.  He is the Lord Jesus Christ; He is God Almighty.  He is the one who descended to earth from the glories of heaven (Philippians 2:5-7) in order to become a man, and then through death and resurrection become the son of man (Daniel 7:13-14).

As this man became the son of man, so He as God became the Son of God.  He is one.

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted.

Securing Undistracted Devotion to the Lord

1 Corinthians 7:35 This I say for your own benefit; not to put a restraint upon you, but to promote what is appropriate and to secure undistracted devotion to the Lord.

Why do I say to follow the Lord instead of the trinity?  So as “to secure undistracted devotion to the Lord” from you.

Who is the Lord if it is not Jesus?  And if Jesus is Lord, and Paul wants to secure our undistracted devotion to the Lord, then is he not calling for undistracted devotion to Jesus?  And if Scripture is calling for undistracted devotion to Jesus, why do trinitarians seek to set alongside Him two other objects of devotion?

Did the Father not tell us to follow the Son?  Is the Holy Spirit not sent on behalf of the Son?  Therefore, be devoted wholly to Jesus Christ.

It’s difficult enough to follow the Lord when your eye is single (Luke 11:34 King James Version; also see 1 Peter 4:18) – how much more difficult if your vision is blurred.

Be completely devoted to Christ!

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted.

Psalm 111:2

Psalm 111:2 Great are the works of the LORD;
They are studied by all who delight in them.

Whose works are greater than those of our Lord Jesus Christ?  He emptied out Hades (Sheol) so that everyone now goes to heaven at death.  That is, He made a new heavens and a new earth – according to promise.  And then there are all the works He did on earth for us during the days of His flesh.  These were not tricks of magic but rather acts of compassion.  Yes, they were supernatural through the power of the Holy Spirit, but that was because He had already given away His worldly treasure – both in heaven and on earth.  That is, God gave up heaven to come to earth, and, as a man, He gave up all He had to serve the people of God.  The Holy Spirit was the source of power in all the good works, because Jesus had nothing left of His own to give.  Thus God will take responsibility for sourcing our generosity if we havefirst given all that we have of our own.

There is no shortage of the Lord’s works – whether as God or man or resurrected man – which we can study.  Let us therefore study and delight in them!

Jesus is no junior partner in the affairs of God.  He is the beginning and the end, the alpha and omega, the first and the last (Revelation 22:13).

 

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted.

Jesus Proved Himself as a Man, and Then Proved Himself as a Lord Before He Inherited the Universe

Through the earthly life Jesus lived (as described in the gospels of the New Testament), he proved himself worthy of resurrection.  And He was resurrected, accordin to promise.

Through the heavenly life Jesus lived (as chronicled in the book of Acts and the epistles that follow it in the New Testament), He proved Himself worthy of inheriting the universe by the way He led the Israel of God – that is, the church.  And He came again, according to promise.

In the coming of the kingdom, Jesus inherited all things – just as He was promised (Hebrews 1:1-2).

We often speak of the noteworthy life Jesus lived as a man, and it is right that we do.  Nevertheless, we should not overlook the life He lived at the right hand of God as He led the greatest generation of Jews who ever lived.  This was the bride of Christ, the true church of God that none of today’s churches can replicate.  And the Lord Jesus was the shepherd who led them.  He thus proved Himself worthy to govern all the nations.  Thus was fulfilled this scripture:

Psalm 2:8 ‘Ask of Me, and I will surely give the nations as Your inheritance,
And the very ends of the earth as Your possession.

And with that passing of the baton, Christ became all in all.  The kingdom of God came, and it was His.

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted.

Is Jesus Beside the Point?

Is Jesus Christ beside the point?  Not in a million years!

Why then do Trinitarians make a point of the Trinity – which, of course, makes Jesus beside the point?

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

Christian or Trinitarian?

A Christian, as defined in the Bible (Acts 11:26; 26:28; 1 Peter 4:16), is someone devoted to Christ.

A Trinitarian, therefore, would be someone devoted to the Trinity.

To which are you devoted?

As for me, I am devoted to Christ.

I can find command in the Bible to be devoted to Christ (such as 2 Corinthians 11:3) but I can find no commands there to be devoted to the Trinity.

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. (In the NASB New Testament, quotations of the Old Testament are rendered in all capital letters in order to make them easier to identify.)

Honor Christ as God

In this age, we know that Christ is God.  That is, God came to the earth to live as one of us.  Specifically, He came to live as Jesus of Nazareth.

When Jesus was raised from the dead, His disciples knew He was unique. And when He came again, they knew He was God.

In the New Testament, Jesus was honored as the servant of God who had been sent from heaven to save us.  But in this age – the day of the Lord, the kingdom of God – we know that the servant was none other than God Himself.

For just as “some have entertained angels unawares,” so 1st-century Galileans entertained God unawares.

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. 

We Must Not Impose Gentile Thinking on Jewish Texts

One of the reasons that so much Christian theology misses the mark is that it seeks to understand the New Testament without sufficient attention to the Old Testament.  For example, a Christian theologian sees an expression like “son of God” in the New Testament and tries to understand it by looking up in a dictionary, as it were, the words “son” and “of” and “God” and then putting them together for the answer.  This is how strange doctrines like the Trinity get formed (see There Is No Trinity; There Is Christ).  Of course, there was a lot more Greek philosophy than dictionary involved in that ill-fated theological project, but the point remains the same.

The Old Testament is the most important “dictionary” of New Testament words that anyone could ever have.  Jesus told us, “Salvation is from the Jews”  (John 4:22).  He ought to know.  We should believe Him.

So much of church theology was built from imposing Greek and other Gentile thinking onto New Testament texts with insufficient attention given to the Jewish roots of expressions used in those New Testament texts.  The fourth edition of the Greek New Testament of the United Bible Societies (2001) lists some 300 quotations of, and 1,400 allusions to, the Old Testament.  These linkages must be pursued if the New Testament is ever to be properly understood.

The New Testament cannot stand alone.  It was never intended to stand alone.  It was not even written as a book.  It consists of various documents written to meet very specific needs of various geographically-dispersed communities involved in earliest Christianity.  These communities were organized and led primarily by Jews.  To rightly understand these documents we must study them in this context.  Otherwise, all sorts of misunderstandings will ensue.  And many have.

For this reason I encourage you to survey these posts to better understand how much, and in what ways, the New Testament and Old Testament depend on each other.

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

 

The Apostles Taught One Lord…and Only One Lord

There is only one Lord, and the apostles made clear that it is not God the Father.

1 Corinthians 8:5 For even if there are so-called gods whether in heaven or on earth, as indeed there are many gods and many lords,
1 Corinthians 8:6 yet for us there is but one God, the Father, from whom are all things and we exist for Him; and one Lord, Jesus Christ, by whom are all things, and we exist through Him.

Note that this passage clearly states that there is only one Lord – and it is not God the Father.  It is Jesus Christ, the Son of God.

To confirm the point, remember this passage:

Ephesians 4:4 There is one body and one Spirit, just as also you were called in one hope of your calling;
Ephesians 4:5 one Lord, one faith, one baptism,
Ephesians 4:6 one God and Father of all who is over all and through all and in all.

Again, the apostle could not be more clear:  there is one Lord…and it is not God the Father.

Jesus is Lord!

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. (In the NASB New Testament, quotations of the Old Testament are rendered in all capital letters in order to make them easier to identify.)

Christ Versus the Trinity

I have written many posts on why our focus should be on Christ, and that the “Trinity” is a false and unbiblical concept.

The foundational post on this subject is: There Is No Trinity; There Is Christ.

Over 200 other posts written on the subject between July 2011 and April 2013 can be found listed at: Posts to Date on the Trinity Versus Christ.

Going forward, I’ve created a category on this blog called “Christ versus Trinity” where blog posts on this subject will appear.  Click on that category which you should find on the right (or you can just click here) and you will find all the posts written on this subject going forward.

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted. (In the NASB New Testament, quotations of the Old Testament are rendered in all capital letters in order to make them easier to identify.)

Genesis 18:25

“…Shall not the judge of all the earth do right?”  –  Genesis 18:25 King James Version

Of course, the judge of all the earth shall do right.  It is impossible for Him to do otherwise, for there is, of course, no corruption in God.

Thus when God appointed His Son to become judge of the world it was with the idea that justice would continue to be be done.

Acts 17:30-31 “Therefore having overlooked the times of ignorance, God is now declaring to men that all people everywhere should repent, because He has fixed a day in which He will judge the world in righteousness through a Man whom He has appointed, having furnished proof to all men by raising Him from the dead.”

As the Father judged, so the Son judges.  (See John 5:19-23, especially verse 22.)  The transfer of power was seamless.  (For this reason, many people still do not know that Jesus Christ Has Already Come Again.)  This seamlessness is appropriate given that the Father and Son are one.

For more on how the Father and Son are one, see:

There Is No Trinity; There Is Christ

Posts to Date on the Trinity Versus Christ

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB, unless otherwise noted.

As the Rejected Stone Became the Cornerstone, so the Father Became the Son

Psalm 118:22 The stone which the builders rejected
Has become the chief corner stone.

God was experiencing rejection from His creation.  He turned the other cheek and came closer to us by donning human flesh.  He did this to demonstrate His great love for us.  That is, God became Jesus of Nazareth, the Creator became one of us.

In executing this transformation of Himself, God was dying to who He was in our lives, that He might live to who He wanted to be in our lives:  our Savior, our Deliverer, our Rescuer, our Champion, our Hero…our All in All.

God put Himself through this for our sake.  He wanted the dead stones (that is, we were dead to Him) to become a living stones (that is, we could become alive to Him through Christ).

God became Christ.  O blessed Creator, what wonders You perform!

For more on this metamorphosis from God to Christ, see:

There Is No Trinity; There Is Christ

Posts to Date on the Trinity Versus Christ

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Scripture quotations taken from the NASB.

The Trinity Shell Game

You’ve probably seen the carnival game where the performer has three shells on a table and under one of them He places a pea.  Then he moves the three shells around in rapid fashion so that those who are watching lose track of which shell has the pea.  It’s a sleight-of-hand trick that’s been around for ages.

Church leaders, in effect, say that God is playing a shell game with us regarding Himself, but that they have figured out the game – and their answer is that there are three peas, one under each shell!  It’s not a very satisfying conclusion to the game, but then there’s nothing very satisfying about the trinity concept.  It’s more a way of obfuscating God than it is a way of explaining Him.

The truth is simple and straightforward.  God spoke of Messiah throughout Old Testament times.  By New Testament times, Jews were very expectant that Messiah was about to make His appearance.  Unbeknownst to anyone, God Himself came to earth to be that Messiah.  After He was raised from the dead and taken up into heaven, He waited until the day He would be revealed as God.  That was the day of the Lord (Jesus Christ Has Already Come Again).  On that day Messiah was revealed to have been God Himself!

Since we live in that eternal day of the Lord, it is losg past time that we should recognize that Jesus Christ is eternally Lord of all.  He is our God and He is our Father.  He was before…and now He always will be.

God does not play games with us.  He tells us the truth.  Until He reveals truth about Himself, it remains a mystery.  Once He has made Himself known, however, the truth shines forth clearly.  Follow Christ…and you will find God.

For more, see:

There Is No Trinity; There Is Christ

Posts to Date on the Trinity Versus Christ

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

Christ Is a Type of God

The Bible is filled with types of Christ.  (A type is a representation or pattern of something; a foreshadowing.)

Enoch is a type of Christ (because Enoch “walked with God” and “was taken up”).  David is a type of Christ (because David was a triumphant king).  Solomon is a type of Christ (because Solomon was a regent of peace).  The Scriptures explicitly declare that Adam was a type of Christ (Romans 5:14) and that Isaac was, too (Hebrews 11:19).  The book of Hebrews gives an extended explanation of how Melchizedek foreshadowed Christ.

There is a category of posts in this blog titled “Types and Shadows” which, as of the current date, identifies over 50 types of Christ in the Bible.  Many books have been written about biblical types which list far more than I have.

Thus seeing types of Christ in studying the Bible is neither new nor original.

However, it is worth noting that Christ Himself is a type of God.  As Christ suffered on the cross from the rejection of His people, so God Himself suffers daily as His creation rejects Him.  Just as Jesus uttered no threats from the cross, so God utters no threats as we have our picnics, watch our television shows, and enjoy each other’s company – all while generally disregarding anything He might want to occur in any of those settings.

God created us and all that we see.  How is it right that we live life as if He were absent?  Who acknowledges Him as if He were present – other than an occasional perfunctory prayer (and even those are being eliminated in public meetings)?

It is long past time to stop rejecting the presence of God.  He is everywhere.  We should act like it.

As Christ rose from the dead so God rises in our consciousness that we might acknowledge Him every moment of every day.

As is Christ, so is God.  For Christ is God.

For more on the  subject of Christ being God, see:

There Is No Trinity; There Is Christ

Posts to Date on the Trinity Versus Christ

The purpose of this blog is to proclaim Jesus Christ in terms familiar to those who read the Bible, and to help others become more familiar with the Bible. For those unfamiliar with the Bible, see the blog A Nonchurchgoer’s Guide to Jesus and His Kingdom.

GICNAT